Apricot (Prunus armeniaca) Homegrown, tree-ripened apricots are healthy, delicious eating- fresh, canned or dried. Apricot trees are notorious for waking up too early in the spring, and then getting their blossoms zapped by a late frost. You can help by planting on a sheltered north-facing slope. Another trick some old-timers used was spreading a layer of compost or horse-manure under the tree in early winter AFTER the ground was frozen. This slows down soil (and root) warm up in spring, consequently also delaying budbreak. We try to help by offering some of the later-blooming varieties. 1.25-2m (4-6') bareroot trees
Photo by Whiffletree Nursery

Apricot : CAPILANO Semi-Dwarf (Mustang) (Orchard Grade)

$47.95

In stock

An 'orchard grade' is a tree that may be somewhat shorter, slightly crooked, or a bit scratched, or for some other reason is not a perfect front lawn specimen. These trees will work just as well in an orchard as a first or number one would, since they still produce the very same fruit.

Capilano's background is just opaque enough to add a certain compelling mystique to this up-and-coming variety. The story starts with three apricot trees growing along the street in Edmonton's Capilano neighbourhood. Local fruit hobbyists and foragers took notice when they began bearing. As nearly as anyone can ascertain, they are likely apricot seedlings, probably planted by a local resident, sometime in the 1960s. The fruit itself cannot be faulted. Of the three trees, the southernmost one in particular, had gained enough of a following to make it inevitable that it would be propagated and spread abroad. Here is your chance to grow your own Capilano tree and harvest some of the same sweet, 5cm (2") fruit that endeared the original to the good folks in Edmonton.

SELF-FERTILE | ZONE 3/4 | HARVEST : MID-LATE JULY

Rootstock
Pollenizer
Zone
Harvest
Rootstocks
G41 Dwarf
(2.5-3.1m/8-10ft)
G935 Small Semi-Dwarf
(3.25-4m/10-13ft)
G969 Small Semi-Dwarf
(3.25-4m/10-14ft)
G30 Semi-Dwarf
(3.6-5m/12-16ft)
G890 Semi-Dwarf
(3.6-5m/13-16ft)
Pollenator definitions
Some trees and many berry plants are SELF-FERTILE ̶means the insect pollinators or even the wind can pollinate the blossoms without the need of a second tree.
NEEDS A POLLENIZER ̶ means another tree of the same type or kind but a different variety must be blooming nearby at the same time.
EXAMPLE A Liberty apple and a Wealthy apple can cross-pollinate. Two trees of the same variety ie: ̶ 2 Wealthy apples, cannot cross pollinate because they are genetically identical.
Other trees are marked as SEMI-FERTILE. These will set fruit without a second tree. However they will often bear more, and sometimes larger fruit if another variety of the same kind of tree is nearby.
You can select 2 different trees of the same kind marked as NEEDS A POLLENIZER or plant one of those along with one SELF-FERTILE or one SEMI-FERTILE. Also consider ripening times ̶ a Goldrush apple might not start blooming before a Pristine is finished.

Other products in this zone

Growing Tips

Apricot / Peach Growing Tip

One of the key factors that determines cold-hardiness for tender fruit trees such as apricots and peaches is how well they harden off in the fall. Any activity that stimulates growth should be avoided after August 1. This includes fertilizing, overly frequent watering and pruning.


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