Asian Pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) Asian pears are crunchy and very juicy with a refreshing flavour totally different from European pears. The Chinese and Japanese have been growing them for 3000 years. In the California Gold Rush of 1849, they were introduced to America by Chinese miners. In recent years they have become better known and quite popular. Asian pears are very productive and should be hand-thinned for better fruit size and to avoid limb breakage. In contrast to European pears, they are best when thoroughly ripened on the tree. To avoid bruising, handle gently when picking. Storage life is outstanding, some in excess of six months. Asian pears develop the best flavour in a hot summer, so plant in a somewhat sheltered location with full sun exposure. The trees are more compact than European pear trees and offer great visual appeal with their masses of white blossoms in the spring followed by waxy green leaves that turn into a spectacular array of fall colours. Pollination Tip All European (regular) and Asian pears will pollinate each other providing their bloom times overlap. Generally you can go by the expected harvest time, meaning only the very early and the very late might not be compatible with each other. However, since Asian pears, on average, bloom earlier than Europeans, you might pair an early European with a mid or late Asian. 1-2m (3-6') bareroot trees
Photo by Whiffletree Nursery

Asian Pear : YOINASHI Large Semi-Dwarf (OHxF97)

$49.95

In stock

Yoinashi means "good pear" in Japanese. It is considered one of the more cold hardy Asians. Sweet, richly aromatic flesh with flavour that has been described as "having a little bit of zip". Excellent quality, large, orange brown fruit is crisp and finer-textured than most asian pears. Upright growing tree is resistant to both Pseudomones disease and fireblight.

SEMI-FERTILE* | ZONE 4/5 | HARVEST: EARLY-MID OCT.

Pollenizer
Zone
Harvest
Rootstocks
G41 Dwarf
(2.5-3.1m/8-10ft)
G935 Small Semi-Dwarf
(3.25-4m/10-13ft)
G969 Small Semi-Dwarf
(3.25-4m/10-14ft)
G30 Semi-Dwarf
(3.6-5m/12-16ft)
G890 Semi-Dwarf
(3.6-5m/13-16ft)
Pollenator definitions
Some trees and many berry plants are SELF-FERTILE ̶means the insect pollinators or even the wind can pollinate the blossoms without the need of a second tree.
NEEDS A POLLENIZER ̶ means another tree of the same type or kind but a different variety must be blooming nearby at the same time.
EXAMPLE A Liberty apple and a Wealthy apple can cross-pollinate. Two trees of the same variety ie: ̶ 2 Wealthy apples, cannot cross pollinate because they are genetically identical.
Other trees are marked as SEMI-FERTILE. These will set fruit without a second tree. However they will often bear more, and sometimes larger fruit if another variety of the same kind of tree is nearby.
You can select 2 different trees of the same kind marked as NEEDS A POLLENIZER or plant one of those along with one SELF-FERTILE or one SEMI-FERTILE. Also consider ripening times ̶ a Goldrush apple might not start blooming before a Pristine is finished.

Other products in this zone

Growing Tips

Asian Pear Growing Tip

Asian Pears are very precocious which means they tend to produce quite heavily when only a few years old. This can result in a weakened tree as all its energy is going into producing fruit instead of forming a sturdy tree. For this reason we recommend removing most of the fruit for the first several years.


Pear Pollination Growing Tip

All European (regular) and Asian pears will pollinate each other providing their bloom times overlap. Generally you can go by the expected harvest time, meaning only the very early and the very late might not be compatible with each other. However, since Asian pears, on average, bloom earlier than Europeans, you might pair an early European with a mid or late Asian.


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